Philip Pullman

I recently had the good fortune to collaborate on stage a couple of times with author Philip Pullman (His Dark Materials Trilogy, The Good Man Jesus and the Scoundrel Christ, Lyra's Oxford, etc).  He and I first met to discuss Sum at Queen Elizabeth Hall in November of 2009.  Miranda Richardson and Jarvis Cocker gave live readings of Sum stories at the event, and pre-recorded readings of stories were provided by Stephen Fry and Clarke Peters.

More recently Philip and I were on stage together at the Charleston Festival of Literature in the south of England. The event was moderated by author and documentary filmmaker Bill Nicholson. See a review of the event here.  

I can't say enough about Philip: he is smart, generous, terrifically talented, and a pleasure to collaborate with.

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From the Blog

  • Why public dissemination of science matters
    Why public dissemination of science matters

    Communicating science to the public can take time away from a busy research career. So why should scientists do it? I offer a manifesto of six reasons in the Journal of Neuroscience. 

  • A note about head shape in mummies
    A note about head shape in mummies

    A few months ago I scanned a 3,000 mummy. What can (and can't) be concluded based on his perspicuously elongated skull shape, known as dolicocephy (elongated head)?  

  • Possibilianism at PopTech
    Possibilianism at PopTech

    I recently spoke at PopTech on the limits of science, the problems of false dichotomies, and my new movement of possibilianism. See the video.

  • CNN's Next List - video profile
    CNN's Next List - video profile

    I was recently named a CNN Next List Fellow. Watch two clips from the show.

Newsflashes

Sum on Radiolab

Listen to David discussing Sum -- and actor Jeffrey Tambor reading stories from the book -- on WNYC's Radiolab.

Sum #2 book in UK

In September, 2009, Sum became the number 2 book in the United Kingdom on Amazon's bestseller list, only behind Dan Brown's Lost Symbol.

New Scientist time story

New Scientist magazine features David Eagleman's time perception research as their cover story.
Cover of 24 October 2009 issue of New Scientist magazine

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