We love NPR’s Radiolab. If you haven’t listened to it yet, you should. Check out some of the following episodes:

Blame and the Brain – in which David argues for tossing out blame as an old-fashioned, unfair way of thinking about the law.

Falling – in which David talks about the way time seems to go when you’re falling.

Afterlife – in which actor Jeffrey Tambor (Arrested Development) reads several stories from Sum, and David talks about the possibilities for downloading brains into silicon.

Stayin’ Alive – in which David talks about an unusual possibility for recovering lost languages.

Sum – a short episode in which Jeffrey Tambor reads the title story from Sum.

And don’t miss this incredible video:

Radiolab presents: Moments by Will Hoffman. This film is a celebration of life that was inspired by David Eagleman’s book, Sum.

Last I checked, this had 1.5 million views on Youtube.

"David Eagleman may be the best combination of scientist and fiction-writer alive."
- Stewart Brand
"What Eagleman seems to be calling for is a new Enlightenment."
- Sunday Herald
"David Eagleman offers startling lessons.... His method in both Sum and his new book, Incognito, is to ask us to cast off our lazy, commonplace assumptions."
- The Guardian
"David Eagleman is the kind of guy who really does make being a neuroscientist look like fun."
- New York Times
"Eagleman has a talent for testing the untestable, for taking seemingly sophomoric notions and using them to nail down the slippery stuff of consciousness."
- The New Yorker
"A popularizer of impressive gusto...[Eagleman] aims, grandly, to do for the study of the mind what Copernicus did for the study of the stars."
- New York Observer
"[A] neuroscientist and polymath."
- Wall Street Journal