New Scientist time story

New Scientist magazine recently featured my time perception research as their cover story.

If you're interested in more about time perception, here are a few review papers:

  • Eagleman DM (2009). Brain Time. In What's Next: Dispatches from the Future of Science, M. Brockman, Ed. Vintage Books. [Full text at Edge.org] 
  • Eagleman DM (2008). Human time perception and its illusions. Current Opinion in Neurobiology. 18(2):131-6. [Full text]
  • Eagleman DM & Pariyadath V (2009). Is subjective duration a signature of coding efficiency? Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society. 364(1525):1841-51. [Full text]

Leave a comment

From the Blog

  • David appointed Fellow with Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies
    David appointed Fellow with Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies

    Posthumanism asks what happens when our technologies allow humans to enhance intellectual, physical, and psychological capacities beyond what biology can give us. Think bionics on crack.

  • British musician Jarvis Cocker reads from Sum
    British musician Jarvis Cocker reads from Sum

    Hear British rocker Jarvis Cocker read the short story "Descent of Species" from Sum.

  • BrainCheck
    BrainCheck

    How can you rapidly detect whether someone has a concussion? I've just launched a new company, BrainCheck, that uses tablets and neuroscience to find out.  

  • Breivik's Brain
    Breivik's Brain

    What could explain Anders Breivik's shooting attack in Oslo, Norway? While this is debated from the angles of politics, religion, and sociology, I want to ask this from the viewpoint of neurobiology.

Newsflashes

Eagleman TEDx talk

See David Eagleman's TEDx talk entitled "The Future of Reality"

SUM is Book of the Year: Chicago Tribune

SUM was chosen as the best book of 2009 by Chicago Tribune's Pulitzer-winning literary critic Julia Keller.

Why Brain Science Matters

Why should the US invest in brain science? See David's opinion in the New York Times.

You are here:   HomeBlogNew Scientist time story


Coming Soon